Last edited by Dolabar
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of Plato"s Erotic Thought found in the catalog.

Plato"s Erotic Thought

The Tree of the Unknown (Rochester Studies in Philosophy)

by Alfred Geier

  • 387 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by University of Rochester Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ancient Greek & Roman philosophy,
  • Philosophy,
  • Love,
  • Symposium,
  • Plato,
  • History & Criticism - General,
  • History & Surveys - Ancient & Classical,
  • Philosophy / General,
  • History & Surveys - General,
  • Lysis,
  • Phaedrus,
  • Plato.

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages248
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8779785M
    ISBN 101580460682
    ISBN 109781580460682

    Plato’s Symposium is one of the most iconic works of literature in the Western tradition. While The Republic may be more famous, Symposium is the most graphic, intense, and dramatic of the dialogues. Its legacy has been far reaching, inspiring religion and mysticism, to visions of art, the good, and the beautiful. The Symposium is about love, eros more specifically. Socrates goes on to compare a written text to a painting: You know, Phaedrus, that is the strange thing about writing, which makes it truly correspond to painting. The painter’s products stand before us as though they were alive. But if you question them, they maintain a most majestic silence. It is the same with written words.

    The Plato's experience didn't take hold in Los Angeles when, in , Levenson opened Plato's West as part of a failed attempt at franchising. "It didn't really translate well to the beautiful. This clear and accurate exposition of Greek political thought offers a comprehensive exploration of the works of Plato and Aristotle. Students of political science and the history of Western philosophy will appreciate its insights into the sources of state power, the nature of political organization, the aims of the state, citizenship, justice, law, and related concepts.4/5(11).

      Plato discusses love (erôs) and friendship (philia) primarily in two dialogues, the Lysis and the Symposium, though the Phaedrus also adds significantly to his each work, Socrates as the quintessential philosopher is in two ways center stage, first, as a lover of wisdom (sophia) and discussion (logos), and, second, as himself an inverter or disturber of erotic norms.   Plato and Aristotle on Health and Disease The link between mind and body has long been recognized. Posted


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Plato"s Erotic Thought by Alfred Geier Download PDF EPUB FB2

I wonder if you are familiar with James Rhodes's close reading of the erotic dialogues in Eros, Wisdom, and Silence?Rhodes was a political scientist, and in that book he argued, among other things, that eros is key to understanding Plato's larger his account, Plato perceived the rise of would-be tyrants in Athens as a symptom of the corruption of the youth by a twisted eros, a.

—Plato. Whereas Aristotle is not nearly as interested in erotic love (erôs) as he is in friendship (philia), for Plato the best kind of friendship is that which lovers can have for each other. This work is an attempt to understand the nature of the object of Eros in Plato's writings.

In the first chapter certain considerations based on a passage in Plato's Symposium lead to a discovery and characterization of the nature of that object and several of its features.

Then it is realized that the chief problem or mystery about the nature of the object of Eros is how it arises. Alfred Geier is a professor of classics at the University of Rochester and author of Plato’s Erotic Thought: The Tree of the Unknown ().

He is working on a sequel on Plato’s writings on friendship. Article tools. Print. Email. Discuss (2) Share. More articles from this issue. Plato's erotic thought: the tree of the unknown / Alfred Geier. series title. Rochester studies in philosophy 3.

imprint. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, The book then explores the Lysis and the Phaedrus, which both address how the object arises, in two different ways, the Socratic and the Platonic. Plato is perhaps the most significant and influential philosopher in the Western tradition.

He lived from c. B.C.E. and was a student of Socrates and teacher of Aristotle. At one time Plato wrote that the best relationship would be an erotically charged relationship between men, though he believed the highest relationship would not.

The Phaedrus (/ ˈ f iː d r ə s /; Greek: Φαῖδρος, translit. Phaidros), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato's protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several Phaedrus was presumably composed around BCE, about the same time as Plato's Republic and Symposium.

Although ostensibly about the topic of love, the discussion in the dialogue revolves. In this book, Sara Monoson challenges the longstanding and widely held view that Plato is a virulent opponent of all things democratic. She does not, however, offer in its place the equally mistaken idea that he is somehow a partisan of democracy.

Instead, she argues that we should attend more closely to Plato's suggestion that democracy is horrifying and exciting, and she seeks to explain why. Republic, Book 1 Gorgias Meno Euthydemus Hippias I and II Cratylas Symposium Phaedo Republic, Books Timaeus Laws As has already been pointed out, Plato uses Socrates as the main interlocutor in his dialogues.

The specific way that Plato makes use of the character of Socrates varies some-what during the different periods in which Plato wrote. CONTENTS Unit 1: Plato’s Life, His Ideal State and Theory of Justice 1 Unit 2: Plato’s Communism and Theory of Education 14 Unit 3: Aristotle’s Life and His Conception of Human Nature and State 27 Unit 4: Aristotle’s Theory of Revolution 42 Unit 5: Niccolo Machiavelli 65 Unit 6: Thomas Hobbes 87 Unit 7: John Locke Unit 8: Jean Jacques Rousseau Unit 9: Jeremy Bentham Plato On Friendship, Love, And Sex Read an excerpt from my new book, 'Plato: Letters to my Son' Posted   Plato's Erotic Thought: The Tree of the Unknown by Alfred Geier.

Hardcover $ Ship This Item — Qualifies for Free Shipping Buy Online, Pick up in Store is currently unavailable, but this item may be available for in-store purchase. Publish your book with B&: Alfred Geier. Get this from a library. Plato's erotic thought: the tree of the unknown. [Alfred Geier] -- "This work is an attempt to understand the nature of the object of Eros in Plato's writings.

In the first chapter certain considerations based on a passage in Plato's Symposium lead to a discovery. Plato marks a shift in the history of Western sexuality and some say he invented romance, but, for him, erotic passion was a spiritual force. Get this from a library.

The Symposium: and, the Phaedrus ; Plato's erotic dialogues. [Plato.; William S Cobb] -- The Symposium and the Phaedrus are combined here because of their shared theme: a reflection on the nature of erotic love, the love that begins.

Two more books I have read on Plato since I first wrote this review that I thought were excellent and definitely worth mentioning are: Plato and the Good: Illuminating the Darkling Vision (Philosophy of History and Culture) by Rosemary Desjardins.

Desjardins offers a really interesting and exciting interpretation of Plato's metaphysics, which Reviews: Get this from a library. Plato's erotic world: from cosmic origins to human death. [Jill Gordon] -- "This book examines the fundamental importance of eros in Plato's writing, arguing that he sees the world as erotic from cosmic origins to human death"-- "Plato, ♯s̥ entire fictive world is.

Padia, Chandrakala. "Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau and Hegel on Women: A Critique." The Indian Journal of Political Science (): 27– Print. Plato. "The Role of Women in the Ideal State." The Republic, Book V.

Dorbolo, Jon. Oregon State. BCE Web. Smith, Nicholas D. "Plato and Aristotle on the Nature of Women.". Probably the most influential book to have taken this approach is Andrea Nightingale's Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy (Cambridge, ).

According to Nightingale, Plato gives philosophy a distinct voice in Athenian intellectual conversation by bringing it into relation with other, competing forms of discourse, such as.

It seems to me that several of the themes you’ve mentioned are central to another of the Plato books you’ve chosen, which is by Plato himself, and is generally regarded as one of his greatest works, the Republic.

In Greek it’s Politeia, which we translate as ‘constitution.’ ‘Republic’ is actually the English translation from the Latin title, Res Publica, which means ‘the. This book and the work that went with it created a school of interpretations of Socrates and of Plato vis-à-vis Socrates, thoughts about how we should understand Socratic method and so on, which dominated a large part of Anglo-American (less so European) ancient philosophy for a very long time.

Eros and Philia are the two Greek words, which can be translated as love in English. This article focuses on the idea that Plato weaves around the emotion of love. On the one hand, there is the verb philein and its cognates (philia is the noun, philos the adjective)—a word we use all the time when we talk about philanthropy, philosophy, philharmonic, and the like.Start studying Plato's Republic BOOK III.

Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.